From Power BI

The data behind Gartner’s BI Magic Quadrant visualized in Power BI

Since I published the post Gartner’s BI Magic Quadrant visualized in Power BI I’ve  gotten quite a lot of requests to share the data the Power BI report is based on. In this post I will do just that.

In the end of this post there is a link to an Excel file that can be downloaded that includes all classifications needed to create the report yourself.

Excelvisual

The Excel file is constructed by collecting magic quadrant images published by Gartner, and converting all BI vendors position in the charts into two percentages numbers – one for the execute- and one for the vision dimension. Please be aware that there might be a small difference in this data compared to Gartner’s original images. For most accurate data, always use Gartner’s original publications.

Download Excel file: Gartner-BI-2008-2016

KPI Indicator custom visual for Power BI explained

Since the creation of the KPI Indicator custom visual (originally submitted to the Power BI Custom Visual Contest) I have been getting a lot of feedback and support from users all around. Therefore, I thought it would be appropriate to give a more extensive description of the different properties that can be customized in this visual.

Screendump1
What you first need to consider is the type of banding you want for your KPI. The banding type describes the way the KPI’s actual value is compared to its target value. Take a look at the following illustration of the three different banding types available:

BandingTypes

Banding type “Increasing is better” is used when the KPI is considered better the higher the value is (e.g. Gross Profit). Banding type “Decreasing is better” is used when the KPI is considered better the lower the value is (e.g. Costs). Banding type “Closer is better” is used when the KPI should be close to a target and its equally bad to be far from it, no matter if it’s on the positive or the negative side (e.g. Number of employees).

When customizing the properties for the KPI Indicator the formatting panel looks like this:

Screendump2

Here comes a description of the different properties:

KPI name
This is the name of the KPI Indicator. It is displayed at the top of the visualization. By default (or if left blank), it uses the name of the measure that is used as actual value.

Banding percentage
If the Banding comparison property is set to “Relative” this value should be entered as a percentage number (of the target). If the Banding comparison property is set to “Absolute” this value should be entered as a non-percentage number (that will be added/subtracted from the target instead).

Banding type
The banding types are one of the three banding types described in the illustration above.

Banding comparison
The Banding comparison can either be “Relative” or “Absolute”. If this property is set to “Relative” the banding percentage is calculated as a percentage of the target. If this property is set to “Absolute” the banding percentage is calculated as a subtraction to/from the target.

Chart type
This property decides whether the trend indication should be a line chart or a bar chart.

Deviation as %
The Deviation as % is On by default. This means that the Actual value compared to the Target value will be presented as a percentage deviation. The deviation is presented to the right of the actual value. If this property is switched off the deviation will not be treated as percentage. It is typically useful when Banding comparison is set to “Absolute” and the actual value is not measured in %.

Thousands separator
This property can be used to force the formatting of the actual value to be formatted with thousands separators. This is typically useful when working with larger non-percentage measures.

Basically, that’s the stuff you need to know to fully utilize the KPI Indicator custom visual for Power BI.